EpicRaptorMan blogged
Nov 5, 17 1:02am


Here we have a small semi-aquatic mammal that lived about 164,000,000 years ago during the Jurassic Period. Its remains were discovered in what is now Mongolia embedded in lakebed sediments which further points to a semi-aquatic lifestyle.
A distinctive feature of Castorocauda was its tail. Their tails were broad and covered with scales and hair, although hair growth lessened towards the tip and the caudal vertebrae was flattened. This paddle-like tail would have been great for Castorocauda when propelling itself through the water. On top of that, impressions of webbing can also be found in between the toes.
If you haven't realized it yet, Castorocauda is quite similar to a beaver or an otter. In fact, the genus name Castorocauda means "beaver tail" and the species name lutrasimilis translates to "similar to otter". And like the modern platypus, Castorocauda seems to be adapted to digging as well. We know this by looking in depth at their robust forelimbs.

Judging by the animal's teeth Castorocauda was a piscivore, feeding on fish and small invertebrates within its Jurassic environment. And by Jurassic standards at 500-800g (1 to almost 2 pounds) and 42.5cm (17 inches) in length, Castorocauda was a very large mammaliaform!
SR-JM blogged
Nov 4, 17 1:50pm

Our most exciting school task to take on yet is to pick your favourite novel and do around 20 full page illustrations. I picked The Martian from Andy Weir, wish me luck so I can finish it on time!
You can still reach me here, but I might be unavailable for trading and breeding sessions.
Elektrakosh blogged
Nov 4, 17 11:51am

A penguin was driving down the road one night, when the "Check Engine" light came on. He pulled over at the gas station, and the attendant said he'd take a look at it, and tell him what was wrong.
The penguin went over to a nearby shop and bought a vanilla ice cream cone. He finished the ice cream, threw the wrapper away, and walked back to the gas station, where the attendant was waiting for him.
"It looks like you blew a seal," said the attendant.
"Oh, no. Its just vanilla ice cream," replied the penguin.
Elektrakosh blogged
Nov 2, 17 8:49am

The family wheeled Grandma out on the lawn, in her wheelchair where the activities for her 100th birthday were taking place. Grandma couldn't speak very well but she could write notes when she needed to commmunicate.
After a short time out on the lawn, grandma started leaning off to the right, so, some of the family members grabbed her sat her up straight and stuffed pillows on her right side. A short time later, she started leaning off to the left so some of the family members grabbed her sat her up straight and stuffed pillows on her left side.
Soon, she started leaning forward, so family members grabbed her and tied a pillow around her waist to hold her up. A nephew arrived late and came up to grandma and asked 'Hiya gran, you're looking good how are they treating you?'
Grandma took out her little note pad and pen and slowly wrote a note to the nephew 'Those bastards won't let me fart!'
Elektrakosh blogged
Nov 2, 17 1:53am

After years of being blasted into a net, the human cannonball went to the circus owner and told him he was going to retire.

"But you can't!" Shouted the cigar-chomping boss. "Where am I going to find a man of your caliber?"
EpicRaptorMan blogged
Nov 1, 17 9:18pm


Only one skeleton of this sauropod has been discovered and that was in 1984. However, this solo skeleton was essentially complete making Amargasaurus well known. This animal was small for a sauropod only reaching 9-10 (30-33 feet) in length and weigh up to 2.9 tons (5,800 pounds). Amargasaurus is a part of the family of sauropods known as the Dicraeosauridae and like other members within this family they too had relatively short necks (of about 2.4 meters or 7.9 feet). And that is where this sauropod's unique feature lies... Amargasaurus' cervical vertebrae were installed with upwardly elongated neural spines. The neural spines were bifurcated down the entire neck thus creating a double row. The longest of these spines was located on the eighth cervical and reached 24 inches in length.
The true purpose and appearance of these spines is still currently unknown. It is, however, possible that these spines were covered in keratinous sheaths (which could add alot of length to the overall structure) similar to present day bovids such as antelopes, bison, and goats. These spines may have been used as a weapon against carnivores when the sauropod's neck was lowered and suddenly pulled backwards when the predator attacked. Other uses could possibly include display for courtship or intimidation for rivals. Some scientists have also hypothesized that rivaling males would interlock their spines when fighting. And a more bizarre hypothesis was made by Gregory Paul in 2000, he thought the spines could have rattled into one another when the animal shook its neck; creating sound.

In 1997, Jack Bailey suggested that the spines of Amargasaurus supported a sail used for display. Though unlike other sail-bearing animals such as Dimetrodon, Amargasaurus' neural spines were forked, creating a double row along the neck and back. The possibility of possessing two parallel sails only 3-7 centimeters apart seemed unlikely. Also, the presence of a sail on the neck would hinder flexibility.
Elektrakosh blogged
Nov 1, 17 1:50pm

A seaman meets a pirate in a bar, and talk turns to their adventures on the sea. The seaman notes that the pirate has a peg-leg, a hook, and an eye patch.
The seaman asked, "So, how did you end up with the peg-leg?"
The pirate replied, "We were in a storm at sea, and I was swept overboard into a school of sharks. Just as me men were pulling me out, a shark bit me leg off."
"Wow!" said the seaman. "What about your hook"?
"Well", replied the pirate, "We were boarding an enemy ship and were battling the other sailors with swords. One of the enemy cut me hand off."
"Incredible!" remarked the seaman. "How did you get the eye patch"?
"A seagull dropping fell into me eye," replied the pirate.
"You lost your eye to a seagull dropping?," the sailor asked incredulously.
"Well," said the pirate, "that be me first day with me hook"
Captain blogged
Oct 26, 17 7:45am

I've been thinking about a certain post that seems to come up every few months or so here and that is "Why are you still here?"

About a year ago, that answer would have been simple. Chimaira had the Retro Revival and I was maybe interested in helping it. I've said it many times already. I had broken a long time period of inactivity here when I got a notification from him. I didn't know it was going to blossom into something like today.

Now, Retro isn't as bopping as it was during its revival which was sort of to be expected. I'm modding there again and I feel like it is my fault for it becoming so stagnant. Some days I tell myself "Yep, this is the day I'll ask Gotenks to step down again." Others I'll be flowing with ideas. Today is one of those days I where I feel like a poor mod and that I don't deserve the spot. Truth be told, I don't. I took it because maybe I could emulate what Chimaira did about a year ago (or is it 2 now?) and Retro Gaming would be as cool as ever. allingo is the one with the good ideas. I feel like I'm just along for the ride at this point.

To go back to my original idea on why I'm here: I just don't know. It may be out of habit. It may be because I feel obligated to show up every day to check on Retro Gaming. It may be because I enjoy posting updates on Payday 2. It may be because people like Dark Xionei, Intoxication, sword_of_omens, and others enjoy my Vault tales.

I am not leaving the site. As much as I may say I am, I cannot. There's always going to be that one game I'm running or one write up I'm doing that sits in my mind and tells me "Cap, you gotta show up on Neoseeker since people think your post is kind of cool." Trust me, I tried to put an end to that kind of stuff, but then on my up days I start something new so my down days can hate me for it.

Anyway, I'm still here. I might step down or I might not. I don't know. What I will tell you is that there's always gonna be something here for me to do.

I suppose I'll see you all out there, yeah?
Elektrakosh blogged
Oct 21, 17 12:26pm

I don't think I could ever go and pass a driving test. I just know that I'd fail for stalling...

With an irate driving instructor screaming at me to get in the f**king car.
EpicRaptorMan blogged
Oct 21, 17 2:42am

Concavenator is a genus of theropod dinosaur that lived in what is now known as Spain during the early Cretaceous period. The type species being C. corcovatus which translates to "hump-backed hunter of Cuenca".

Concavenator was named in 2010 and is considered to be a basic carcharodontosaurian dinosaur of medium size (about 20 feet in length) being related to larger and more popular predators like Carcharodontosaurus and Giganotosaurus.
However, Concavenator seemed to be unique... It possessed two elongated vertebrae located just before the pelvis that would have formed a tall and narrow hump on the animal's back. The purpose of this hump is unknown although it is theorized that it was used for either display, storage of fatty tissues, or aid in thermoregulation.

On the ulna of the dinosaur's forearms there appears to be the presence of quill knobs or homologous structures. Birds and some feathered dinosaurs like Velociraptor also have quill knobs present on their ulnas...it is believed that these knobs were used to anchor down hollow, quill-like structures.
That's not all, wide and rectangular shaped scales were also preserved on the underside of the tail, bird-like scutes on the feet, and pads on the bottom of the feet -- all of which contribute to an interesting discovery.


shadow1xmaster blogged
Oct 18, 17 3:15pm

Selling my level 241
account as I no longer have the time to commit to this game. Hoping someone can continue the domination of this account. I completed entire summer season, obtaining top stones for Kinnarus, Borgian, Zamrok, Nydryr, and the top drag Merkt. This account has had over $3,000 spent on it, placing in the global leaderboard for nearly every event. Currently breeding Garnet eggs, moving to Emerald after 3 more drags, (Avalanche, Zaru, and AA). Stats/pics below, feel free to ask questions.

Attack: 211m
Defense: 55.6m
Medals: approx 20m
All farms at level 42
Storage at 61
Several level 43 towers
TONS of shards saved up!
Over 6 months elite account remaining

Emerald Dragon Stones for:
-Kinnarus (now level 45)
-Borgian (now level 45)
-Aster (now level 45)
-Nydryr (now level 37)
-Zamrok (now level 18, haven't used him much yet)

OBSIDIAN STONE!
-Merkt (now level 41)

This combination of drags has proven more powerful than players well above my level. A proper hit with Borgian or Hauheset and Kinnarus can take bases close to level 400. Enjoy!

All pics at found at this link. Not sure how to post pics on here.add me line loyaltyhonor
EpicRaptorMan blogged
Oct 14, 17 3:00am

We're back at it again with prehistory's weirdest and most wonderful creatures. This time we will be featuring Prolibytherium. This even-toed ungulate lived during the Early Miocene and inhabited North Africa and Middle East and the name of this strange beast means "Before Libya's Beast".

Prolibytherium is a prime example of extreme sexual dimorphism. The first feature you probably noticed were their horns -- or more appropriately, their ossicones. The males had broad, leaf-shaped ossicones that could measure 14 inches in width while the females had slender, horn-like ossicones.
However, as far as taxonomy goes Prolibytherium is an uncertainty... Currently Prolibytherium is described as a climacoceratid (a family that is close to the ancestry of giraffes), but in the past Prolibytherium was described as a palaeomerycid or basal Giraffoidea.

What is an Ossicone?
An ossicone is a horn-like protrusion seen on the heads of giraffes, male okapis, and their extinct relatives. Unlike horns, ossicones aren't made up of living bone they are actually made up of ossified cartilage. Ossicones are also covered in skin and fur; not horny keratin. Antlers on the other hand consist of bone tissue and once mature the skin and fur (called "velvet") is scraped away to reveal the bone.



EpicRaptorMan blogged
Oct 12, 17 4:42am


Prehistory has shown us a good deal of giants...but what about the birds? Specifically the birds capable of flight? Read this to learn more about a pair of prehistoric big birds.

Discovered in 1980 Argentavis magnificens held the record for the largest flying bird in history. The size and structure of A. magnificens' wings show scientists that this bird mostly flew by soaring and only flapping its wings for short journeys. This bird could have also relied on thermal currents to keep itself in the skies. Scientists have estimated that the minimal flying velocity of A. magnificens' wings of about 25mph (40kmh).
A. magnificens possessed strong and stocky legs; legs strong enough to give the bird a running and jumping start. However, A. magnificens still needed the aid of the wind to takeoff...so the mountains could've been a perfect environment.

Argentavis magnificens:
-Wingspan Max: 7m (22 feet)
-Height: ~1.5 to 2m (about 5 to 6.5 feet)
-Weight: 70-72kg (154-159 lbs)

Pelagornis sandersi:
-Wingspan: ~6.1 to 7.4m (20-24 feet)
-Weight: 22-40kg (48-88 lbs)

In 2014, A. magnificens' record of largest flying bird (in terms of wingspan) was challenged and broken by Pelagornis sandersi. The wingspan of P. sandersi is about double the wingspan of the current largest flying bird, the Wandering albatross (max wingspan of ~3.5m).
P. sandersi had small legs so its takeoff probably consisted of hopping off cliffs. The relatively small body and long wings of this bird coupled with the rising currents from the oceans in which it flew over allowed this prehistoric giant to stay in the air.

There is no doubt that some flying birds have reached some massive sizes throughout prehistory, but even Argentavis and Pelagornis aren't anything special compared to the azhdarchid pterosaurs of the Cretaceous period like Quetzalcoatlus...
Elektrakosh blogged
Sep 28, 17 9:39am

Whenever I see a man with a beard, moustache and glasses, I think, ‘There’s a man who has taken every precaution to avoid people doodling on photographs of him.'
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